East Kingdom Results from the December 2019 LoAR

LoARs are published on the Laurel Archives page each month.

  • An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society.
  • A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work.
  • A “pend” indicates that the item is being held for a month while additional research or work is done.

East Acceptances

  • Alastar Tucker. Device. Per pale indented Or and azure, a boar rampant contourny and a wyvern erect counterchanged.
  • Alexandre Saint Pierre. Badge. Per pale gules ermined Or and Or ermined gules.
  • Aloysius Sartore. Device. Argent, a brown stick hobbyhorse issuant from base proper bridle and reins azure, a bordure sable semy of increscents argent.
  • Asleif Gylfisdottir of Ruantallan. Device. Per pall inverted argent, sable, and azure, in pale an open book Or and a dolphin haurient contourny argent.
  • Asther de Perpinya. Badge. Per fess engrailed argent and azure, a Heneage knot inverted, ends terminating in serpent’s heads counterchanged vert and argent.
  • Bruno Bruni. Name and device. Per bend sinister rayonny checky gules and Or and sable.
    Nice early 15th century Italian name from Florence!
  • Caterina Lombardi. Alternate name Hedwig von Reichenbach.
  • Elizabeth Ivette. Release of device. Gyronny gules and Or, four roses Or and four holly leaves stems to center gules.
  • Elspeth Schmalczin von Meittingen. Badge. (Fieldless) A dragonfly quarterly gules and argent.
  • Finna Hrafnsdóttir. Device change. Per pale argent and azure, a raven displayed facing sinister, on a chief sable a sword argent.
    The submitter’s previous device, Per pale Or and argent, on a fess between a raven displayed sable and a tree eradicated vert two swords in saltire proper, is released. There is a step from period practice for the use of a bird in a displayed posture other than an eagle.
  • Friderich Grimme. Alternate name Friðrekr Haraldsson.
    Submitted as Friðrekr Haraldarsson, the submitter requested authenticity for “Norse Viking Dublin, 1050 C.E.” Although Haraldarson is the appropriate form for later Scandinavian names, the 11th century form of the byname is Haraldsson. With the submitter’s permission, we have made that change to meet the submitter’s authenticity request. This name is authentic for 11th century Iceland. However, we have no evidence of the name Friðrekr in Ireland. Therefore it partially, but not completely, meets the submitter’s request.
  • Gillian de Whittemere. Device change. Argent, in fess a crow rising sable and a fox rampant to sinister proper, on a chief triangular azure a rose argent. The submitter’s previous device, Per bend azure and argent, a rose argent and a fox salient proper, on a chief argent three martlets sable, is released. Artist’s note: Please draw all charges larger to fill the available space.
  • Lilie Dubh inghean uí Mórdha. Alternate name Kaðlín Bergsdóttir.
    Submitted as Kaðlín Bergsdottir, diacritical markings must be used consistently throughout Old Norse names. Therefore, we have changed the name to Kaðlín Bergsdóttir for registration. The submitter requested authenticity for “Norse Viking Dublin, 1050 C.E.” This name does not meet this request because we do have evidence for either name element being used in Ireland during that time period. However, this name is authentic for 9th-10th century Iceland.
  • Mæva Rafnsdottir. Name and device. Vert, a ram statant contourny argent armed and an orle Or.
    Submitted as Mæva Rafndottir, the name was changed at Kingdom to Mæva Hrafnsdóttir to match the documentation Kingdom could find. In commentary, however, ffride wlffsdotter documented the patronymic Rafnsdottir as a 14th century Icelandic form. At the submitter’s request, we have changed the name to Mæva Rafnsdottir for registration.
  • Monkey Makgee. Device. Sable, a monkey sejant erect contourny argent maintaining a skimmer Or and on a chief argent three pomegranates gules.
    This is the defining instance of a skimmer. A skimmer (or in Italian, schiumarola) is a cooking tool for removing the top layer of fats from soup: it consists of a perforated cup, with a long handle attached perpendicular to the cup’s mouth. We find it illustrated in the Opera of Bartolomeo Scappi, 1570; Scappi was the personal cook for Pope Pius V. As a documented period artifact, the skimmer is acceptable as a charge in Society heraldry.
  • Morwill MacShane. Badge. Vert, a rapier bendwise sinister between two ducks argent.
  • Muirgel Bera. Device. Argent, a brown bear rampant proper maintaining a nettle sprig, on a chief vert three bees Or.
  • Nicholas von Winterbach. Device. Per bend rayonny purpure and argent, two ravens counterchanged.
  • Raghnall Fergusson. Name and device. Sable, on a bezant a thistle proper, in chief a bee, a bordure Or.
    This name combines a Gaelic given name with a Scots byname, an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C.
  • Rayya bint Estani. Name change from Katriona Silverswan.
    This name combines an Arabic given name with a Turkish byname, an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C. The submitter’s previous name, Katriona Silverswan, is released.
  • Thora Kottr. Name (see RETURNS for device).
    Nice 9th-10th century Icelandic name!
  • Þorfinnr Hróðgeirsson. Request for name reconsideration from Þórfinnr Hróðgeirsson.
    The submitter requested reconsideration to remove the diacritical mark over the o in the given name. In support of that request, evidence was provided showing transliterations that do not use the marking. As the given name can fairly be transliterated either with or without the diacritical marking, the form without the diacritical marking is registerable. The existence of transliterations without the diacritical marking also means that this name is not internally inconsistent in its use of markings. Accordingly, we are granting the request for reconsideration and will register the name as Þorfinnr Hróðgeirsson. The submitter’s previous name, Þórfinnr Hróðgeirsson, is released.
  • Tyffayne de Trumpington. Device. Azure, on a unicorn’s head erased argent armed Or a dove gules, an orle of paw prints Or.
    There is a step from period practice for the use of paw prints.
  • Westley Morgan. Name (see RETURNS for device).
    Nice late 16th century English name!
  • Yngvarr Magnusson. Name and device. Quarterly argent and azure, a wolf passant sable and a point pointed gules.
    The submitter may be interested to know that Magnusson is a later-period form of the byname. If the submitter wants a name appropriate for the so-called Viking Age, it would be Yngvarr Magnúsarson (with or without the marking on the u). If the submitter prefers this form, he may make a request for reconsideration.

East Returns

  • Ar n-Eilean-ne, Shire of. Badge for populace. (Fieldless) A headless stockfish split and tergiant argent.
    This would have been the defining instance of a stockfish. The headless fish, split down the belly and laid tergiant, is a period charge peculiar to Iceland which dates from at least 1500 and is found in several government documents and seals of the time period. This badge must be returned for conflict with the device of Adrian of Longacre, Per bend sinister gules and sable, a stingray tergiant displayed argent. There’s a DC for fielded vs fieldless armory, but not between types of flatfish.
  • Ívarr Valsson. Badge. (Fieldless) A falcon striking Or.
    This badge is returned for conflict with the device of Eve Nightstalker, Azure, an owl striking Or, beaked and membered argent, orbed sable. There’s a DC for fielded vs fieldless armory. There is no DC for changing the head orientation from dexter to guardant. Given the shape of the bodies and the use of a non-period posture, there is a clear visual similarity between the two pieces of armory which prevent a DC for type of bird.
  • Thora Kottr. Device. Per chevron sable and Or, an increscent, a decrescent and a domestic cat rampant counterchanged.
    This device is returned for conflict with the device of Sáerlaith ingen Rúadáin, Per chevron sable and Or, an increscent and a decrescent Or and a fox rampant gules. While the bottommost of three charges two and one is considered “half the group” for conflict purposes, SENA A5C2d sets a maximum of one DC for the cumulative changes to that bottommost charge.
  • Westley Morgan. Device. Per pale gules and sable, a dragon’s head couped contourny counterchanged.
    This device is returned for lack of contrast. The submitter attempted to justify the low-contrast animate charge by documenting similar counterchanging over per pale fields in 16th Century German armory. They documented the use of dragon’s or wyvern’s heads (though the examples do not match the submitted artwork), and the use of low-contrast counterchanged charges using sable and gules. However, the attested armory provided (the first three from Siebmacher’s Wappenbuch, the last from Anton Tirol’s Wappenbuch) are:
    • von Radenhausen Per pale gules and sable, an eagle counterchanged
    • die Zimmer Per pale sable and gules, two hooks addorsed sable
    • von Berbisdorf Per pale gules and sable, two arms counterchanged holding aloft a crown Or
    • Per pale gules and sable, a wheel counterchanged
  • In each of these designs, the armory is symmetrical. In the first and last, the charge which overlies the field is mirrored in its symmetry; in the other two, the counterchanged charges lie entirely on separate parts of the field with no line of division changing the tincture. Because of this, the evidence as submitted does not demonstrate the pattern of counterchanging a single asymmetrical animate charge over a low-contrast line of division. Upon resubmission, the submitter is highly encouraged to use the depiction of the dragon’s heads found in the attested armory, rather than the modern-looking logo artwork of the dragon’s head in this current submission.

East Kingdom Results from the November 2019 LoAR

LoARs are published on the Laurel Archives page each month.

The Society College of Arms runs on monthly cycles and letters. Each month, the College processes name and armory submissions from all of the Kingdoms. Final decisions on submissions are made at the monthly meetings of the Pelican Queen of Arms (names) and the Wreath King of Arms (armory). Pelican and Wreath then write up their decisions in a Letter of Acceptances and Return (LoAR). After review and proofreading, LoARs generally are released two months after the meeting where the decisions are made.

  • An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society.
  • A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work.
  • A “pend” indicates that the item is being held for a month while additional research or work is done.

East Acceptances

Ada Wright. Name and device. Per pale gules and argent, three square weaver’s tablets counterchanged.

Nice English name from the mid-15th century onwards!

Angela Vittoria di Enrico Spinelli. Name.

Submitted as Angela Vittoria D’Enrico Spinelli, the name was not correctly formed. In medieval Italian, the patronymic marker di did not elide to d’ before a vowel. We have corrected the name to Angela Vittoria di Enrico Spinelli for registration.

Arnora Ketilsdottir. Badge. Per chevron argent and sable, a chevron rompu azure and in base a compass star Or.

There is a step from period practice for the use of a compass star.

Deirdre Grenewode. Name and device. Azure, on a lozenge argent an acorn azure.

This name combines a standardized Gaelic given name with an English byname, an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C.

Eva von Kölln. Device. Vert, surmounting a cross between in chief two oak leaves and in base two otters statant erect addorsed argent, a heart Or.

Freydis in illa. Name.

This name uses the feminine form of the attested Old Norse descriptive byname inn illi. As a general rule, descriptive bynames based on nouns in Old Norse do not change spelling to match the gender of the given name; descriptive bynames based on adjectives, however, generally do change for gender. Because inn illi is an adjectival byname, the feminine form, in illa, must be used with the female given name Freydis.

Gisla Skogadottir. Name.

Julian zum weißen Raben. Name and device. Per fess sable and Or, on a sun counterchanged a raven displayed sable and a raven displayed argent.

Submitted as Julian Weissraben, the pattern for the byname could not be documented. The Letter of Intent argued that Weissraben was a plausible constructed German byname. However, we were unable to find any examples of two element German bynames in the pattern Color + Animal. The only examples in the Letter of Intent were of Color + Inanimate Object, such as Weißärmel (white sleeve), which does not support the requested name.

On the other hand, the combination of a color and an animal is found in German inn-sign bynames, such as zum Roden Lewen (at/from the Red Lion). With the submitter’s permission, we have changed this name to Julian zum weißen Raben, using an attested German pattern and meaning. “at/from the White Raven.”

There is a step from period practice for the use of birds in the displayed posture other than eagles.

Kunigunde Wedeman. Name.

Morwenna Penrose. Name and device. Azure scaly argent, a ray of the sun issuant from dexter chief Or.

Natal’ia Bolotnikova. Name.

Silas Oein. Name and device. Argent, an elephant and a base sable.

Submitted as Silas mac Eoin, the Scots byname Oein was suggested by Adelaide Pympernell in commentary. The submitter prefers this byname and requested a change. We have done so.

Silas is the submitter’s legal given name. However, the submitter does not need to rely on the Legal Name Allowance because Silas is also a late period English given name.

Silas Oein. Badge. (Fieldless) A bat purpure.

Symon of Barnsdale. Badge. (Fieldless) Three lozenges conjoined in pall azure.

East Returns

None.

East Kingdom results from the October 2019 LoAR

LoARs are published on the Laurel Archives page each month.

The Society College of Arms runs on monthly cycles and letters. Each month, the College processes name and armory submissions from all of the Kingdoms. Final decisions on submissions are made at the monthly meetings of the Pelican Queen of Arms (names) and the Wreath King of Arms (armory). Pelican and Wreath then write up their decisions in a Letter of Acceptances and Return (LoAR). After review and proofreading, LoARs generally are released two months after the meeting where the decisions are made.

  • An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society.
  • A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work.
  • A “pend” indicates that the item is being held for a month while additional research or work is done.

EAST acceptances

Ageirr the Lucky. Name and device. Or, two foxes salient respectant gules, in base a sheaf of five arrows sable.

Artist’s note: Please draw all charges larger.

Alastar Tucker. Name.

The spelling Alastar appears in the Gaelic Annals of Loch Cé, referring to events in the 16th century.

This name combines a Gaelic given name with an English surname, an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C.

Alienor Salton. Badge. Per pale purpure and Or.

Nice badge! The submitter has permission for her badge to conflict with the badge of Mathghamhain Ua Ruadháin, Per pale vert and Or.

Amalie von Hohensee. Name and device. Azure, three seeblätter one and two, a trimount argent.

Artist’s note: Please draw the seeblätter larger.

Arngeirr Refskegg. Name and device. Per chevron argent and azure, two pairs of spears in saltire sable and a hummingbird hovering to sinister argent.

Nice 9th-10th century Icelandic name!

There is a step from period practice for the use of a New World hummingbird.

Bregowine of Horseheath. Device. Azure, a horse’s head couped argent crined gules and a chief Or.

Cathain Reiter. Name and device. Gules, a bow bendwise drawn and with a threaded needle nocked Or.

There is a step from period practice for loading a bow with an item other than an arrow.

Cathain Reiter. Badge. (Fieldless) A bow bendwise drawn and with a threaded needle nocked Or.

There is a step from period practice for loading a bow with an item other than an arrow.

Corotica Senebelenae. Name and device. Per chevron gules and sable, a wolf courant and a wheat stalk leaved argent.

Submitted as Corotica merkka Senebelenae, the marker merkka is not appropriate for this name. We were unable to find firm support for the form merkka or merka as a vernacular Brythonic marker. Moreover, the rest of the name is Latin and would not have used a vernacular patronymic/matronymic marker in any event. As the submitter allows all changes but specifically does not want the Latin marker filia, we have registered the name with an unmarked matronymic (an attested pattern for Latinized British names) in the form Corotica _ Senebelenae.

Dirkin MacWard. Device. Per pale vert and Or, a ram-headed torc counterchanged argent and sable.

Artist’s note: Please draw the heads of the rams attached to the body of the torc.

Eleanor de Astlye. Badge. Vert, three bees Or, in chief a hazel branch fesswise argent.

This badge was pended for redraw on the June 2019 LoAR.

Note: This depiction of a hazel branch is from the submitter’s device, and is allowed under the Existing Registration Allowance.

Elspet Catto. Name and device. Pean, two weasels combatant maintaining between them a wheel argent.

Gregor von Medehem. Device. Quarterly sable and gules, in bend two stags trippant argent.

This submission has permission to conflict with the device of Magdalena von Regensburg, Quarterly vert and argent, two hinds trippant argent.

Hildibrandr loðinkinni. Device. Per bend vert and sable, a beaver rampant vorant of a fish Or.

This device was pended for redraw on the June 2019 LoAR.

Kelsey Macpharlane. Device. Azure, a calamarie and on a chief argent a thistle vert headed purpure.

This device was pended for redraw on the June 2019 LoAR.

Lavinia du Bois. Device. Sable, on a bezant a pantheon rampant sable mullety, in base a hand Or.

Lavinia du Bois. Badge (see RETURNS for other badge). Sable, on a hand Or a brown bear’s head erased proper muzzled argent.

Mari Clock van Hoorne. Badge. (Fieldless) An owl argent crowned with a coronet Or pearled argent and maintaining in its talons a card-pique sable.

The submitter is a court baroness and is thus entitled to display a coronet.

Mathghamhain Ua Ruadháin. Badge. Per pale vert and Or.

Nice badge! The submitter has permission for his badge to conflict with the badge of Aliener Salton, Per pale purpure and Or.

Østgarðr, Crown Province of. Order name Order of the Sea-Urchin of Østgarðr (see RETURNS for badge).

Submitted as Order of The Sea-Urchin of Østgarðr, we do not capitalize the articles in order names. Therefore, we have changed the name to Order of the Sea-Urchin of Østgarðr to use our standard style.

Østgarðr is the registered name of an SCA branch.

Rhode Kephalaina. Badge. (Fieldless) A calamarie per pale vert and purpure.

This badge was pended for redraw on the June 2019 LoAR.

Rudolf Siege. Device. Per pale azure and gules, on a cogwheel Or a dragon sable.

Shiklah al-Zarqa’. Name.

The submitter requested authenticity for an unspecified time, place or culture. Shiklah is a 9th century Arabic given name. However, we were unable to put a precise date on the Arabic epithet al-Zarqa’, although it appears as a name in literature from the Abbasid Caliphate (750-1258 C.E.). Thus, we cannot say for certain whether this name is authentic for 9th century Arabic, but it may well be.

Þorn hálftr{o,}ll. Name.

Tomislaus Kievich. Device. Gules, a man statant affronty arms upraised sustaining in chief a Viking longship hull Or.

This device was pended for redraw on the June 2019 LoAR.

Unna Rose. Name.

Rose is the submitter’s legal surname.

Vigthorn Rose. Name.

Rose is the submitter’s legal surname.

Vindiorix Ordovix. Name change from Finn the Black.

Submitted as Vindiorix Ordowik, the byname did not use the same transliteration conventions as the given name. PN2D requires names to use a single consistent transliteration system. As the submitter allows all changes, we have corrected the name to Vindiorix Ordovix for registration.

The submitter’s previous name, Finn the Black, is retained as an alternate name.

East Kingdom Results from the September 2019 LoAR

LoARs are published on the Laurel Archives page each month.

The Society College of Arms runs on monthly cycles and letters. Each month, the College processes name and armory submissions from all of the Kingdoms. Final decisions on submissions are made at the monthly meetings of the Pelican Queen of Arms (names) and the Wreath King of Arms (armory). Pelican and Wreath then write up their decisions in a Letter of Acceptances and Return (LoAR). After review and proofreading, LoARs generally are released two months after the meeting where the decisions are made.

  • An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society.
  • A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work.
  • A “pend” indicates that the item is being held for a month while additional research or work is done.

East Acceptances

Agnes de Lyon. Device. Or, two badgers combatant sable marked argent, on a chief vert a rapier argent.

Aleta d’Argent. Device. Argent, on a pall azure a hummingbird rising contourny argent. There is a step from period practice for the use of a New World hummingbird.

Ali al-Abbas. Name and badge. (Fieldless) A masculyn vert braced with a masculyn Or.

Questions were raised in commentary about whether al-Abbas could be used as a byname. The attested name of the 14th century historical figure Al-Afdal al-‘Abbas is sufficient to give the submitter the benefit of the doubt that al-‘Abbas or al-Abbas can be used as a byname.

Ali al-Abbas. Badge. (Fieldless) Two masculyns braced Or.

Alric the Younger. Device. Vert, a boar’s head erased close, on a chief enarched argent four broad arrows vert.

Please instruct the submitter to draw the head’s erasures more boldly, so they may be distinguished. The erasures would be grounds for return or pend for redraw normally, but they match those of the previous submission, and weren’t mentioned then.

Ameline qui dosnoie. Name and device. Sable, a panther couchant argent spotted and collared azure incensed proper, on a chief dovetailed argent three roses fesswise slipped and leaved azure.

Nice late 13th century French name from Paris!

An Dubhaigeainn, Barony. Heraldic title Drake Pursuivant.

Carrick Mac Seáin. Name.

This name combines an English given name with a Gaelic byname, an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C.

Cordeilla Sharpe. Badge. (Fieldless) On a pear vert a bee argent.

The default posture for a bee, as with most winged insects, is volant-en-arrière: the equivalent of tergiant, but usually with the wings spread. As drawn here, the bee’s wings are more folded back along its body. We see this frequently in period emblazons of flies, for example, and consider it an unblazonable variant of the volant-en-arrière posture. The bee’s posture here is acceptable.

Damian MacWard. Name change from Damian Ísólfsson.

The submitter’s previous name, Damian Ísólfsson, is released.

Dimitrios Alexandrou. Name and device. Per pale gules and sable, a double-headed eagle maintaining in its feet a spear fesswise, a bordure Or.

Dúnlaith ingen Donnchada. Name and device. Argent, a mouse statant, on a chief vert three double-bitted axes argent.

The submitter requested authenticity for 12th-14th century Scottish Highland culture. This name does not meet this request because we have no evidence for the given name Dúnlaith later than the 10th century in Ireland, and no evidence of it at all in Scotland. However, this name is authentic for 10th century Ireland.

Dúnlaith ingen Donnchada. Badge. (Fieldless) A mouse statant maintaining a double-bitted axe vert.

Edwyn Le Braser. Name.

Nice 13th century English name!

Étain ingen Ui Néill. Name.

The submitter requested authenticity for 12th-14th century Irish. This name is authentic for 12th century Irish but not later.

Fionnghuala the Volatile. Device. Azure, a manatee haurient to sinister, a chief invected argent.

There is a step from period practice for the use of a New World manatee.

Froði Oddsson. Device. Quarterly sable and purpure, a fox couchant head lowered between three lit candles Or.

Artist’s note: Please draw the candles larger to aid in identifiability.

Froði Oddsson. Badge. (Fieldless) A fox couchant head lowered maintaining a lit candle Or.

Artist’s note: Please draw the candle larger to aid in identifiability.

Joan Malet. Device. Sable, a comet, a gore argent.

There is a step from period practice for use of a gore with another charge.

John Teller. Device. Quarterly sable and Or, a Latin cross swallowtailed argent.

Lupold Hass. Device. Per pale azure and sable, a hare courant argent and a bordure Or.

Nice cant!

Margot de la Mer. Device. Per pale sable and gules, a demi-sun issuant from sinister Or.

Matilda of Oxford. Name and device. Argent, a bear rampant and a bordure azure.

Nice 14th-15th century English name! Nice device!

Miroslava nyakas Miklosne. Name.

Submitted as Milosne Miroslava nyakas, the name was not correctly formed for Hungarian grammar. With the submitter’s permission, and based on commentary provided by Kolosvari Arpadne Julia, we have changed the name to Miroslava nyakas Miklosne to use correct grammar and follow an attested Hungarian naming pattern.

Old Stonebridges, Shire of. Branch name change from Norðfj{o,}rðr, Shire of and device change. Per pale wavy vert and azure, a bridge of two spans throughout and in chief a laurel wreath argent.

Submitted as Shire of _ Stonebridges, that form of the branch name conflicts with the registered household name Stonebridge Freehold. The difference in designator between Shire and Freehold does not count for conflict purposes. As the substantive elements differ only by a single letter, these names conflict.

After the close of commentary, the Shire requested that the name be changed to Shire of Old Stonebridges in order to clear the conflict and submitted a petition supporting the new name. We are pleased to grant this request. Stonebridges is a plausible constructed English place name. This construction follows a pattern found in “Compound Placenames in English” by Juliana de Luna (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/EnglishCompoundPlacenames/) because Stone is an attested element found as a generic toponym and Bridges is an attested English surname. In addition, “Compound Placenames in English” shows the pattern of modifying existing place names with Old, as in the example of Old Braynford (1476). Therefore, this form of the name can be registered because it follows an attested pattern and no longer conflicts with Stonebridge Freehold.

The shire’s previous device, Azure, two mountains couped and a Viking longship, on a chief argent three laurel wreaths vert, is retained as ancient arms.

Old Stonebridges, Shire of. Badge. Per pale wavy vert and azure, a bridge of one span throughout argent.

{O,}zurr Styrbjarnarson. Name and device. Argent goutty vert, a leather boot proper, a base vert.

Panther Vale, Shire of. Branch name and device. Vert chaussé Or, in pale a panther statant incensed Or spotted of diverse tinctures and a laurel wreath Or.

The original petition in support of the name and device supplied with the Letter of Intent was not valid because it was dated nearly two years before the submission. The Shire supplied a corrected and updated petition, allowing us to register their name and device. We commend Muirenn Blue Tyger, her deputies, and the Shire for their work getting us the corrected petition.

The identical name was returned on the June 1999 Letter of Acceptances and Returns for lack of documentation for the element Panther in period English place names. On resubmission, documentation was provided for Panther as a 16th century English surname. This branch name follows the pattern of place names in the form Family Name + Generic Toponym, found in “Compound Placenames in English” by Juliana de Luna (http://medievalscotland.org/jes/EnglishCompoundPlacenames/).

Petr Magnusson. Device. Argent, on a flame vert a dagger inverted proper.

Artist’s note: Please draw all charges larger to aid in identifiability.

Ragnar MacHardy. Alternate name Temür Numuchi.

Ragnar MacHardy. Device change. Sable, three flames proper, an orle Or.

The submitter’s previous device, Per pale gules and Or, a wolf rampant to sinister and in chief two wheels counterchanged, is retained as a badge.

Safiya al-Naghira. Device. Azure, on a bend sinister between two pairs of axes in saltire argent three natural sea-tortoises vert.

Sláine ben Rónáin meic Robeird. Badge. Azure, an acorn argent capped and an orle Or.

Symon of Barnsdale. Device. Per chevron inverted argent and vert, in chief three lozenges azure.

East Kingdom results from the August 2019 LoAR

LoARs are published on the Laurel Archives page each month.

The Society College of Arms runs on monthly cycles and letters. Each month, the College processes name and armory submissions from all of the Kingdoms. Final decisions on submissions are made at the monthly meetings of the Pelican Queen of Arms (names) and the Wreath King of Arms (armory). Pelican and Wreath then write up their decisions in a Letter of Acceptances and Return (LoAR). After review and proofreading, LoARs generally are released two months after the meeting where the decisions are made.

  • An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society.
  • A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work.
  • A “pend” indicates that the item is being held for a month while additional research or work is done.

East Acceptances

  • Adeliza de Lahaia. Name.
    The submitter requested authenticity for 1050-1200 Anglo-Norman. This name meets that request.
  • Ailwin æt Myttune. Name and device. Per fess azure goutty d’eau and vert, a bridge of three spans throughout Or, issuant therefrom three pallets wavy argent.
    Submitted as Ailwin æt Mitune, Old English place names that follow the preposition æt must be in the dative case. Mitune is not the dative case; the dative case is Mytt{u-}ne. Therefore, we have changed the name to Ailwin æt Myttune for registration, omitting the diacritical mark to make the smallest possible necessary change.
  • Aonghus mac Aodha of Invernaver. Name.
    The submitter requested authenticity for 13th-14th century Scottish Highlands. This name does not meet that request because it combines a Gaelic personal name with a Scots place name. Mixed language names of this type were not found in period. Nevertheless, because Gaelic and Scots is a permitted lingual mix per Appendix C, this name can be registered.
  • Brendan Firebow. Badge. (Fieldless) In pall three acorns conjoined by the stems Or.
  • Brice MacTavisch. Name.
  • Bridget MacKinnon. Name and device. Or, a heart gules, a bordure checky sable and argent.
    Artist’s note: Please draw the bordure wider with considerably larger checks.
  • Daniela Rosa da Venezia. Name change from Elena Rosa da Venezia.
    The submitter’s previous name, Elena Rosa da Venezia, is released.
  • Donnchadh mac Eóin. Device. Azure, an open book, on a chief argent a domino mask sable.
  • Finna Hrafnsdóttir. Name change from Eithne Bán ingen Fhiachach.
    The submitter requested authenticity for Viking culture. This name is authentic for 9th-14th centuries in Iceland and possibly elsewhere in Scandinavia as well.
    The submitter’s previous name, Eithne Bán ingen Fhiachach, is released.
  • Geirraðr Otrsson. Name.
    Submitted as Geirraðr Otrson, the byname was not correctly constructed. For Old Norse patronymics, the father’s name must be in the genitive form, which is Otrs. Therefore, we have changed the byname to the grammatically correct Otrsson.
  • Giovanni il Cuoco di Napoli. Name.
    The submitter requested the spelling Geovanni for the given name if it could be documented. We were unable to do so.
  • Hámundr Bjornsson. Name and device. Per chevron paly gules and argent and sable, a chevron Or, in base a bear rampant argent.
    The submitter requested that the byname be spelled with an o-umlaut if that form could be documented. We were not able to do so. Some modern sources use an o with an umlaut in place of the period o-ogonek ({o,}) character. However, we currently have no evidence of o-umlaut in period Scandinavian languages before 1650.
  • Ívarr Valsson. Device. Azure, a fess checky argent and gules between two fleurs-de-lys and a falcon striking Or.
  • Jeanne Robin. Badge. Per chevron inverted flory at the point gules and Or.
    Artist’s note: Please ensure that the field division is centered, including the demi-fleur in the overall height.
  • Kendrick de la Mer. Name and device. Quarterly sable and vert all mullety, a wolf rampant argent.
  • Lily Morgaine of the East. Name and device. Purpure, a lily argent slipped and leaved vert, on a chief argent a roundel between an increscent and a decrescent sable.
    The byname of the East is the lingua Societatis form of the attested Middle English byname del Est.
  • Maryna Borowska. Name and device. Per saltire azure and argent, a domestic cat passant sable, a bordure purpure.
    Nice 16th century Polish name!
  • Maryna Borowska. Badge. (Fieldless) A domestic cat couchant sable maintaining a sprig of bilberry vert fructed azure.
    Artist’s note: Please draw the cat with internal detailing to aid in identification.
  • Sara of Stonley. Device. Per chevron argent and purpure, two quatrefoils gules and an otter rampant argent.
    Artist’s note: Please draw the otter more upright to fill the available space.
  • Sarra Byrd. Name and device. Azure, a martlet, on a chief argent three pomegranates gules slipped and leaved vert.
    Nice English name from the 13th century onwards!
  • Violet Hughes. Badge. (Fieldless) A Suffolk knot purpure.
  • Wynefryde Bredhers. Reblazon of device. Vert, a sprig of three fern fronds within a bordure Or.
    Blazoned when registered in April 2012 as Vert, a fern within a bordure Or, some clarity in the blazoning of the fern was desired.

East Returns and Pends

None.

From Wreath: Unity of Orientation and Posture

Two years ago, I stood in front of the College at KWHSS and promised that within a few months I would have a definitive ruling on Unity of Posture and Orientation that would be comprehensive, easy to understand, and more permissive than previous rulings had been. I wrote my draft that month. And then a submission came through that required me to revisit the draft. This continued pretty much every month since that fateful Road Show. So I thank you all for your patience, and want to assure you that I’ve not been negligent in this goal.

SENA A3D2c reads, in part: “c. Unity of Posture and Orientation: The charges within a charge group should be in either identical postures/orientations or an arrangement that includes posture/orientation (in cross, combatant, or in pall points outward, for example). A charge group in which postures for different charges must be blazoned individually will not be allowed without period examples of that combination of postures.”

While the language seems simple, it makes a lot of assumptions about which types of charges will be in the charge group. The examples given in the rule have three lions in different postures, three pheons in different orientations, and a note about crescents, increscents, decrescents, and crescents pendant. The rule does not address how to compare the posture and/or orientation of dissimilar charges within the same charge group. So the question arises: What should be compared? My predecessors and I each struggled with the nuances of this question, but the consistent principle of all of our rulings has been the same:

If the charges in the charge group can be in the same posture, orientation, or arrangement that includes posture or orientation, they must all be in the same posture, orientation, or arrangement.

(Addendum from Blue Tyger: Also note that precedent states that the orientations of inanimate and animate charges are not to be compared – https://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2017/06/17-06lar.html )

There are some basic categories of charge that have comparable postures and orientations. They are:

Animate Charges (Posture)

  • Standard quadrupeds
  • Quadrupeds that can be tergiant (reptiles, amphibians, moles)
  • Birds
  • Insects, arthropods, and other crawling critters with too many legs
  • Fish and other non-limbed aquatic life
  • Humanoids (including mer-folk)
  • Tailed non-humanoid bipeds (sea-creatures, wyverns, cockatrices, etc.)
  • Serpents

Inanimate Charges

  • Compact, non-orientable charges (suns, roses, roundels, annulets, etc.)
  • Compact, orientable charges (crescents, fleurs-de-lys, compass roses)
  • Long charges

Generally, charges in each of these categories are not comparable. Serpents cannot be rampant because they haven’t the requisite limbs, while bears cannot be nowed because they are not long or flexible enough, so a bear rampant and a serpent nowed may be in the same charge group despite requiring different terms to describe their relative postures. A sun is a radially symmetrical charge that has no orientable top or bottom, while a spear is a long charge that has a definitive top, bottom, and angular orientation. Thus, a spear bendwise and a sun may be in the same charge group despite requiring a specified orientation for only one of the charges.

Within each category, charges are comparable, and so must be in comparable postures or orientations. For purposes of this rule, defaults are disregarded; while the default postures of a lamb and lion are passant and rampant respectively, if they appear in the same charge group they must be in the same posture. For orientation, this is a bit more permissive; the default orientation of a sword is point up while the default orientation of an arrow is point down, but the assumptions of top and bottom are a default-based concept; as long as they are both in the same orientation (palewise, bendwise, fesswise, etc.) or in an arrangement that involves their orientation (in cross, in saltire, in chevron, etc.) then whether they are point-up or point-down is immaterial. If, however, there are two swords in the same charge group, they must both be oriented with the point either to chief or to base, to dexter or sinister, because they are identical charges.

There are two major exceptions to these categories. The first is if one charge in the category is in an orientation or posture that another charge in the same category cannot take on. For example, there are quadrupeds which are almost exclusively found as tergiant in period, such as lizards, tortoises, and frogs. If these charges appear in a charge group with another quadruped which is not found as tergiant in period (e.g., a lion) then they must either be tergiant (and thus not comparable) or in an identical posture to the other quadruped. In other words, a lion rampant and a tortoise tergiant is acceptable, but a lion rampant and a tortoise statant is not. As another example, a stag’s attire is usually found straight (and thus a long, orientable charge) but is also found in annulo in period. However, a sword (a long, orientable charge) cannot be in annulo. If a stag’s attire and a sword are in the same charge group, they must either be in comparable orientations, or the attire must be in annulo (effectively rendering it a compact, non-orientable charge and thus in a different category).

The second major exception is when an orientation of an animate charge is modified from the posture which is inherent to its orientation. Humanoids, sea-creatures, and most quadrupeds have postures with an inherent and immutable orientation (e.g., rampant or statant erect have the body palewise, passant and statant have the body fesswise). But some postures have orientations that are found to be flexible in period. We see, for example, eagles displayed fesswise and both tortoises and frogs tergiant fesswise. If two charges in orientation-flexible postures appear in the same charge group, they must be in the same orientation for purposes of SENA A3D2c.

(Addendum from Blue Tyger)

Also note this precedent, which states that there is not comparable orientation for animate vs. non-animate charges, so they may be in different orientations without violating these rules:

“…  An impressive collection of period armory was provided in commentary in support of considering the orientation of inanimate charges to be distinct from the posture of animate charges.  ”
https://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2017/06/17-06lar.html

From Wreath: Use of the herald badge, and subsidiary badges

From Wreath: Tabard Design and the Use of Trumpets

There has been some discussion lately on whether and how one may display the badge for the College of Arms of the Society for Creative Anachronism: “Vert, two straight trumpets in saltire, bells in chief, Or.”

Like any officer’s badge, use of the herald’s badge as a personal accessory such as a medallion or baldric marks the bearer as an officer of the Society for Creative Anachronism, and specifically a representative of the College of Arms. Determination for who may wear the badge is delegated by Laurel to the Principal Heralds of each kingdom, but if a person is a branch herald, a member of the kingdom heraldic staff, or is acting by appointment of any of the people named above, they may wear the trumpets as an indicator of their role and authority as a herald. Appropriate situations for wearing the herald’s badge include duty shifts as field or cry heralds, consultation tables, and official correspondence.

Unlike the anachronistic use of officer’s badges, heralds’ tabards are a historical garment with a long and proud tradition. When wearing a tabard, a herald is not a representative of the College of Arms, but is instead an officer of the person whose arms appear on the tabard. As such, the tabard should only bear the arms of the noble for whom the herald is speaking, and should only be used in contexts when the herald speaks for their Noble (e.g., court, important ceremonial moments such as the final round of Crown Tournament, etc.) The crossed trumpets badge should not appear on any herald’s tabard, nor should any badge; tabards should bear one set of arms alone, and they should be consistent on the front, back, and sides of the tabard.

For more information on the proper design and construction of a herald’s tabard, please see the class handout made by Bruce Batonvert and Magistra Astra Christiana Benedict: http://mistholme.com/miscellany/heraldic-tabard-construction-2014/

And a clarifying quote from Wreath:

To clarify: the ruling is not to discard or modify existing regalia, but instead to provide guidance in creating new regalia. If you have ancient and venerable tabards with trumpets on them, by all means keep using them until they are no longer serviceable. But if you’re commissioning new regalia, this policy should help you and the artisan decide the form of the regalia and the appropriate armory.

From Wreath: No, You Can’t Have A Badge For Your Particular Heraldic Office

This month, we received a submission for a badge for the office of silent herald for a principality. The badge had previously been returned administratively in November 2018, due to the long-standing prohibition on registration for subsidiary officer positions under the auspices of a Society-level officer by anyone except said Society-level officer. The badge was resubmitted with no statement addressing the previous return, and it’s clear that there’s still some confusion on the issue.

To reiterate: Badges already exist for both the office of Herald and the office of Silent Herald. With the exception of a tinctureless seal for the principal herald of a kingdom, no territory may register a badge for a heraldic office. Existing badges for subsidiary heraldic offices, especially ones registered without association after the ban was put in place, should be either repurposed for other use by the territory or quietly released.

East Kingdom results from the July 2019 LoAR

LoARs are published on the Laurel Archives page each month.

The Society College of Arms runs on monthly cycles and letters. Each month, the College processes name and armory submissions from all of the Kingdoms. Final decisions on submissions are made at the monthly meetings of the Pelican Queen of Arms (names) and the Wreath King of Arms (armory). Pelican and Wreath then write up their decisions in a Letter of Acceptances and Return (LoAR). After review and proofreading, LoARs generally are released two months after the meeting where the decisions are made.

  • An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society.
  • A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work.
  • A “pend” indicates that the item is being held for a month while additional research or work is done.

EAST Acceptances

  • Aaron MacInstalker. Name and device. Vert, two beavers combattant Or and a ford proper.
    Submitted as Arone MacInstalker, the submitter requested the spelling Aaron for the given name if it could be documented. Commenters documented Aaron as a 16th century English given name. Therefore, we have changed the name to Aaron MacInstalker as requested.
  • Aaron MacInstalker. Household name House of MacInstalker.
    Submitted as Clan MacInstalker, it was unclear whether this name was correctly constructed. Evidence shows Clan in Scots used with given names and simple patronymics. Questions were raised about whether Clan would be used with late-period inherited surnames like MacInstalker. Given the choice between a pend for additional research and registration as House of MacInstalker, using an attested pattern for household names based on inherited surnames, the submitter opted for the change.
  • Aaron MacInstalker. Badge. Per fess wavy vert and barry wavy argent and azure, in chief a beaver statant Or.
  • Æsa Sturludottir. Household name Company of Setting Sun and badge. Sable, a demi-sun issuant from base Or eclipsed gules, in chief a mullet of four points elongated to base argent.
    This household name follows the pattern of naming military companies after the full names of their founders or patrons. Examples of this pattern in 16th and early 17th century English include Blue Coats of Captain Roger Sydnam (1573) and Sir John Suckling’s Troop (1640s). Setting Sun was documented as an English given name and surname.
    There is a step from period practice for the mullet elongated to base.
  • Aisha bint Allan. Name and device. Or, three trees blasted, a chief sable.
  • Alexandre l’Espagnol d’Orlienz. Name change from Alexandre Bautista de la Mar and device change. Per fess sable and argent crescenty sable, in chief a lion couchant contourny Or.
    Submitted as Alexandre Li Espaignois d’Orlienz, the submitter preferred the byname l’Espagnol if it could be documented. Heralds at the Pelican decision meeting found l’Espagnol as a French descriptive term used for a person from Spain in Les après disnées du seigneur de Cholières by Nicolas de Cholières, published in 1587. Therefore, we have changed the name to Alexandre l’Espagnol d’Orlienz as requested by the submitter.
    The submitter’s previous name, Alexandre Bautista de la Mar, is released.
    The submitter’s previous device, Purpure, on a cross between four galleons Or, five roses sable, is released.
  • Aliena of the High Reaches. Reblazon of device. Azure, a mountain of three peaks, in chief a compass star argent.
    Reblazoned in March 2001 as Azure, a compass star and a mountain of three peaks issuant from base argent, the mountain is a primary charge while the compass star is visually much smaller. The charges are thus reblazoned as such.
  • Cailte Crobderg mac Scandal. Badge. Sable, a domestic cat’s head cabossed argent charged on the forehead with a triquetra vert.
  • Cecilie Vogelgesangkin. Device change. Or, a martlet azure atop a trimount gules, in chief five musical notes sable.
    The submitter’s previous device, Per pale sable and purpure, two birds respectant argent and an oak leaf inverted Or is released.
  • Christoffel d’Allaines-le-Comte. Household name Maison d’Allaines-le-Comte and badge. Per pale vert and azure, in saltire a ladle and a sword within an orle of ears of wheat Or.
    The element d’Allaines-le-Comte is already registered to the submitter as part of his personal name, and thus did not require new documentation under the Existing Registration Allowance.
    The submitter depicted the ladle in trian aspect, which has been disallowed in recent submissions. However, the depiction closely matches that of the submitter’s legal wife, Isabella d’Allaines-le-Comte, Vert, a cauldron with flames at its bottom and on a chief Or two ladles in saltire vert, and is therefore allowed under the Existing Registration Allowance.
  • Duncan Kerr. Transfer of badge to Eleanor FitzPatrick. (Fieldless) A horse passant gules charged on the shoulder with a cross couped argent.
    With this action, the previously joint badge is now solely owned by Eleanor FitzPatrick.
    Note: This is the Duncan Kerr registered in the East, not the one registered in Caid.
  • East, Kingdom of the. Acceptance of transfer of badge from Eldrich Gaiman. (Fieldless) A camail argent.
  • Eldrich Gaiman. Transfer of badge to Kingdom of the East. (Fieldless) A camail argent.
  • Eleanor FitzPatrick. Acceptance of transfer of badge from Duncan Kerr. (Fieldless) A horse passant gules charged on the shoulder with a cross couped argent.
    This badge was previously jointly owned with Duncan Kerr.
    Note: This is the Duncan Kerr registered in the East, not the one registered in Caid.
  • Eleanor FitzPatrick. Release of badge. Argent, a horse passant and a bordure embattled gules.
  • Eleanor FitzPatrick. Release of badge. (Fieldless) A horse passant gules charged on the shoulder with a cross couped argent.
  • Eleanor FitzPatrick and Julian le Scot. Joint badge. (Fieldless) A horse passant gules charged on the shoulder with a cross crosslet argent.
  • Elspeth Schmalczin von Meittingen. Name change from holding name Sorcha of Ar n-Eilean-ne.
    The submitter requested authenticity for late 15th century German. This name partially meets that request. Both the given name and the surname are from the late 15th century. However, we could not find Meittingen as early as the 15th century; it is attested only in the gray period. If the submitter wishes to drop the locative byname von Meittingen and have a completely authentic late 15th century German name, she may make a request for reconsideration.
  • Emine bint Hamza ibn Habib ibn Hasan. Name change from Erin inghean Chonchobhair.
    This name combines Turkish and Arabic elements, an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C.
    The submitter’s previous name, Erin inghean Chonchobhair, is retained as an alternate name.
  • Esclarmonde al-Andalusiyya. Device. Sable estencelly argent, on a plate an owl displayed azure.
    There is a step from period practice for the use of the displayed posture by a bird other than an eagle.
  • Harun al-Najm al-Shirazi. Name and device. Azure, a heron and on a point pointed argent a mullet of seven points azure.
  • Hekja Hornabrjótr. Name.
  • Markus farmaðr. Name.
    Nice 9th-10th century Icelandic name!
  • Martha bean Ui Bhrádaigh. Name and device. Argent, on a chevron ployé sable between two bears statant and a stag’s head erased azure, three shamrocks palewise Or.
    This name combines an English given name with a Gaelic byname, an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C.
  • Maurita al-Andalusiyya. Device. Vert semy of serpents in annulo vorant of their own tails argent, a sun in its splendor per pale argent and Or.
  • Maurita al-Andalusiyya. Badge. Vert, a sun in its splendor Or within a snake in annulo vorant of its tail argent.
  • Muireadhach Ó Cuileannáin. Name and device. Per pale azure and vert, two horses combatant between in pale a badger passant and a crescent argent.
    Nice 16th century Gaelic name!
  • Olivia Baker. Device. Per chevron fleury counter-fleury Or and gules, two musical notes and a lily counterchanged.
  • Olivia Baker. Badge. Or, in fess three musical notes sable, in base a martlet azure, on a chief gules a lily Or.
  • Pádraig Ó Brádaigh. Request for name reconsideration from Pádraig Ó Brádaig.
    The request for reconsideration is well-founded. The header form in Woulfe actually shows Ó Brádaigh and the name should have been registered in that form. We apologize for the inadvertent error and are happy to make the correction.
  • Quintus Tullius Felix. Name.
    Nice Roman name for the last century of the Republic and the first century of the Empire!
  • Rae mac Brádaigh. Name and device. Argent, a stag at gaze, on a chief sable three shamrocks Or.
    This name combines an English given name with a Gaelic byname, an acceptable lingual mix under Appendix C.
  • Renata Schönnase. Name and device. Per saltire vert and sable, a bull’s head cabossed, in chief an arrow fesswise reversed Or.
    Schönnase is a constructed German byname with the intended meaning ‘beautiful nose’. Various ‘nose’ bynames in Bahlow (Gentry), s.n. Nase include Heseken (“with the nose”), Halfnase (“half nose”), Ruwenese (“crude nose”), dated 1386, 1376, and 1299, respectively. Descriptive bynames with the meaning “beautiful” + body part include Schönhaar (“beautiful hair”, c.900), found in Bahlow (Gentry), s.n. Schönle(in); Schönfu{ss} (“beautiful foot”, 1578), found in Brechenmacher, s.n. Schönfu{ss}; and Sconehals (“beautiful throat”, 1349), found in Brechenmacher, s.n. Schönhals. Therefore, this construction is reasonable and can be registered. We commend the consulting herald(s) who put together these examples, as they provided precisely the information needed to support a constructed byname.
  • William Lockhart. Name and device. Azure, a lion Or charged on the shoulder with a heart gules, an orle Or.
    Nice 16th century Scottish name!
  • Zariy Bandak. Name (see RETURNS for device).
    Submitted as Zari_ Bandak, the given name was not correctly constructed. Ursula Palimpsest documented Zariy as the correct construction for a Persian given name meaning “little yellow one,” based on multiple examples of the Zar- root and the -iy suffix used in attested Persian names. Accordingly, we have changed the name to Zariy Bandak for registration.

East Returns

  • Yehoshua ben Haim haLevi. Device. Azure, a bend engouled of two wolf’s heads, in sinister chief a star of David argent.
    This submission has been withdrawn by the kingdom.
  • Zariy Bandak. Device. Per fess Or and azure, in chief two roundels argent fimbriated each charged with a roundel sable.
    This device is returned for obtrusive modernity. When discussed at the KWHSS Roadshow, the response from the audience was immediate and universal. Especially when combined with the submitted name, which the submitter intended to mean “little yellow one,” the choice of charges, arrangement, and tinctures gave an unmistakable impression of the Minions creatures from the Dreamworks film series Despicable Me who are yellow humanoids who wear goggles that frame their large, round eyes, and dress in blue overalls. To paraphrase the oft-quoted standard for obtrusive modernity, the viewer is grabbed by the scruff of the neck and hauled, willingly or unwillingly, into the modern century (Portia Audi, 8/1992).

East Kingdom Results from the June 2019 LoAR

LoARs are published on the Laurel Archives page each month.

The Society College of Arms runs on monthly cycles and letters. Each month, the College processes name and armory submissions from all of the Kingdoms. Final decisions on submissions are made at the monthly meetings of the Pelican Queen of Arms (names) and the Wreath King of Arms (armory). Pelican and Wreath then write up their decisions in a Letter of Acceptances and Return (LoAR). After review and proofreading, LoARs generally are released two months after the meeting where the decisions are made.

  • An “acceptance” indicates that the item(s) listed are now registered with the Society.
  • A “return” indicates that the item is returned to the submitter for additional work.
  • A “pend” indicates that the item is being held for a month while additional research or work is done.

East Acceptances

Accio Tempo di Firenze. Name.

Agatha Wanderer. Badge. Purpure, a pair of breeches fesswise argent.

Alke von Ossenheim. Device. Per pale argent and sable, two dragons combatant counterchanged, in chief a sheaf of arrows fesswise reversed Or.

Asher de Kent. Name and device. Argent, a hemp leaf vert, a bordure denticulada azure.

Nice late 13th century English name!

This device does not conflict with the device of David FitzMartin, Argent, an oak leaf vert and a bordure azure. There is a DC for changing the bordure, and another DC between an oak leaf and a hemp leaf.

Continue reading East Kingdom Results from the June 2019 LoAR

From Wreath: Pending for Redraw

On the December 2018 LoAR [Wreath] proposed a policy change to armory that was determined by Wreath to require a redraw prior to registration. Rather than returning armory for redraw by the submitter or consulting herald, who would need to interpret Wreath’s descriptions of the issue, instead the Wreath office will pend the submission, provide new emblazons for submitter approval, and run said emblazons through a fast-tracked “Letter of Pends for Redraw,” or LoPfR.

Commentary on this policy was overwhelmingly positive, and we are implementing this policy, starting with this letter. Nine pieces of armory were identified as requiring a redraw, and emblazons were sent out. Every submitter responded approving the revised artwork prior to the publication of this letter.

The process for pends for redraw shall be the following:

  • As soon as possible after the decision meeting where Wreath identifies the need for armory to be redrawn, either the Sovereign or an appointed deputy will create a new emblazon. Where possible, the existing artwork will be used; if necessary, artwork will be sourced as much as possible from period rolls of arms, as well as the Pictorial Dictionary of Heraldry (many thanks to Bruce Batonvert for permission to use his art).
  • Once the new emblazon is prepared and approved (if not prepared directly) by Wreath, the art will be sent to the submissions herald of the submitter’s kingdom, requesting that they reach out to the submitter for approval. A LoPfR will also be prepared, scheduled for release when the LoAR is published. If the submitter approves the artwork prior to the publication of the LoAR and LoPfR, it will be noted on the pended item.

http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2019/06/19-06cl.html#1